Webinars from the Experts

From policy to landscaping and everything between, join us for an opportunity to learn about clean water issues and what you can do to protect America’s waterways.

SOS and Social Distancing

SOS and Social Distancing: Things You Can Do for Clean Water

Want to be a clean water advocate, but not sure where to start? The SOS staff is here to help! In our first Clean Water Webinar, staff share a range of clean water activities that you and your family can take part in to protect clean water while social distancing.

Weakening the Clean Water Act

Weakening the Clean Water Act: What's Different and Why It Doesn't Add Up

In January of 2020, the Environmental Protection Agency enacted a new regulation that will have significant and detrimental repercussions for water quality. A new definition of waterways that are protected under the Clean Water Act altered and removed protections from important freshwater sources including isolated wetlands and ephemeral streams. In this webinar, National Conservation Director Jared Mott walks us through the scientific and legislative background of this new rule and why it doesn’t make sense for protecting water.

Salt in the Water

Salt in the Water: Action on the Ground

Each winter, billions of pounds of salt are spread on America's roads to keep drivers and pedestrians safe. But all this salt poses a major health risk to both humans and wildlife. Join Dr. John Jackson of the Stroud Water Research Center and Kevin Roth of Pennypack Ecological Restoration Trust to learn about how excessive salt affects benthic macroinvertebrates and other aquatic life in freshwater streams, and how one local community group is raising awareness and changing behavior around salt in the community!

Agriculture

Agriculture: Water Quality Problem or Solution?

Agriculture can get a bad rap when it comes to discussions about water quality and water pollution. It’s important to remember, however, that this same industry also holds the keys to significantly reduce common water quality issues in hot spots such as the Great Lakes, Mississippi River, and Chesapeake Bay. Healthy soil, plants, wildlife, water quality, and public health are all closely intertwined. By working with Mother Nature, rather than against her, farmers can support diverse ecosystems, clean water, and a growing population all while improving their bottom line economically.

Landscaping for Clean Water

Landscaping for Clean Water

Green spaces around our homes, neighborhoods, and cities provide beautiful spaces to recreate and homes for wildlife. But they can also have a huge influence on water quality, from fertilizer runoff to riparian buffers. What can individual residents, communities, and cities do to ensure their green spaces are helping keep our streams and creeks healthy? Join us for tips from Doug Ollendike, Community Development Director for the City of Clive, and Tracy Rouleau, President of the Muddy Branch Alliance.

Meet Our Macros!

Meet Our Macros!

Did you know that the bugs living in a stream can tell you how healthy your water is? Aquatic benthic macroinvertebrates are small organisms without a backbone that live on the bottoms of streams. By collecting and identifying these "macros" using the Save Our Streams protocol, volunteer monitors can determine the health of their streams. Join Zach Moss, SOS Coordinator for the Midwest, for an introduction of these amazing critters. You'll learn about the life history of these bugs, how to identify them in the field, and what resources you can use to practice collecting and identifying on your own!

Making a Local Difference with Save Our Streams

Making a Local Difference with Save Our Streams

Save Our Streams volunteer monitors collect powerful data about water quality across the country. In Virginia, the Roanoke Stormwater Division and Henricopolis Soil and Water Conservation District both utilize the Save Our Streams protocol and data to make decisions about stormwater management and conservation initiatives. Join Danielle DeHart, Environmental Specialist with the City of Roanoke, and Stacey Heflin, Conservation Specialist for the Henricopolis SWCD, to hear about their experiences with Virginia SOS and how their departments are leveraging citizen science data to protect clean water.

Healthy Soil, Healthy Water

Healthy Soil, Healthy Water

The health of our streams, lakes, and wetlands depends heavily on the health of the soils upstream. But just what does “soil health” mean? Why is it so important? How did we lose it, and how do we get it back? This introduction to Soil Health is for anyone wondering why soil health is now the hottest thing since the yo-yo.

Telling Your Story: Effective Science Communication Techniques

Telling Your Story: Effective Science Communication Techniques

You've gathered your equipment, headed into the field, and collected your data. Now, you are ready to share your findings and educate your local community. But how can you ensure that your story is shared in a compelling and easy-to-understand way? Caroline Donovan, Program Manager for the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science – Integration and Application Network, will present some of the lessons learned from almost twenty years of synthesizing scientific data into engaging information. Learn about effective PowerPoint presentations, data visualizations, and stakeholder workshops.

Where It All Goes: Wastewater Treatment and Clean Water

Where It All Goes: Wastewater Treatment and Clean Water

Where does water go once it flows down the drain, and how do we make sure it's clean when it comes back out of our faucets? Join us for an introduction to wastewater treatment and its critical role in providing clean water to citizens across the country. Emily Bialowas, Chesapeake Monitoring and Outreach Program Coordinator, and Melissa Atwood, Outreach Manager of Fairfax County Wastewater Management, will walk you through the history of wastewater management, lessons learned, current challenges, and goals for the future.

The Value of Citizen Science

The Value of Citizen Science

What is citizen science, and how can it improve our understanding of the world around us? Join Caroline Nickerson, Program Manager of SciStarter, and the Save Our Streams team for a discussion on the value of citizen science. You'll learn about how different projects utilize citizen science, the accuracy of citizen-collected data, and how citizen science benefits our global community!

Working Together in the Community: Locally Led Volunteer Engagement Experiences

Working Together in the Community: Locally Led Volunteer Engagement Experiences

The Save Our Streams program trains and coordinates volunteer water quality monitors all over the country. Monitoring can be done alone or with a small team, but there is power in numbers! Locally-led, community-based volunteer monitoring groups can effectively engage more neighbors, friends, co-workers, and community partners to monitor more sites on a consistent basis, but it can sometimes be challenging or intimidating to get these movements started and keep them sustained. Join us to hear stories and experiences from some leaders who have effectively recruited, mobilized, and coordinated volunteer monitors within their watersheds.

Planting to Protect Your City's Water

Planting to Protect Your City's Water

Learn about different green infrastructure – like rain gardens, bioswales, and Green Streets – that have been implemented in the City of Portland (OR). Find out from Christa Shier and Svetlana Hedin, from the City's Bureau of Environmental Services, what can be done in your city to reduce the impact of stormwater and what you can do on your own property to protect clean water.

Monitoring Trash and Engaging Communities in the Anacostia

Monitoring Trash and Engaging Communities in the Anacostia

The Anacostia Watershed Society's Trash Trap program collects, sorts, and measures trash flowing down the Anacostia River. That gives this nonprofit the info they need to effectively advocate for protection and restoration of this incredible river. Join Water Quality Specialist Masaya Maeda, Community Engagement Coordinator Stacy Lucas, and Community-Based Restoration Manager Reyna Askew for a discussion about linking data to community engagement and watershed advocacy.

From the Stream to the Tap: Where Stream Health and Drinking Water Meet

From the Stream to the Tap: Where Stream Health and Drinking Water Meet

When discussing water quality, the first image that pops into many people’s minds is the drinking water that comes out of the taps in their home. Clean and safe drinking water is something that most people in the developed world take for granted, but there is a lot of work that goes on behind the scenes to ensure the safety and accessibility of your tap water. Join us as Kyle Danley, Chief Operating Officer of Des Moines Water Works, and Katherine Baer, Director of Science and Policy with River Network, discuss the behind-the-scenes work of getting water from the stream to your tap. They’ll discuss challenges and solutions related to polluted source water, how water is treated to meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards, policy and advocacy in the world of drinking water, and more!

Mobilizing Congregations for Clean Water

Mobilizing Congregations for Clean Water

The faith community is a critical partner in the fight to restore clean water. Mobilizing this sector requires understanding what motivates them. Come hear about successful collaborations with – and within – the faith community and the underlying lessons about those successes.

Salt Watch Kickoff: How Salt Impacts the Environment and What You Can Do About It

Salt Watch Kickoff: How Salt Impacts the Environment and What You Can Do About It

We're kicking off this year's Winter Salt Watch! We will provide background information and updates on the Salt Watch program and then hand it off to our experts. Dr. Gary Johnson will teach us about how road salt impacts our trees, and Phill Sexton will tell us about smarter methods to reduce salt use in the winter months.